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Lesson 28: Mrs. B's Markets

Mrs. B's readers have responded by identifying the markets they would most like her to trade. Here is the tabulation. This list shows the markets that Mrs. B was most requested by her readers to trade. There were almost 50 markets that received votes but Mrs. B has only the time and money to consider trading markets that made it into the top 30 spots. Each market is ranked by the number of votes it received as compared to the number of votes the other markets received. In first place was corn. In thirtieth place was oats.

1st place Corn
2nd place Soybeans
3rd place Wheat
4th place Sugar
5th place Gold
6th place Cocoa
7th place S&P Index
8th place Treasury Bonds
9th place Live Cattle
10th place Crude Oil
11th place Swiss Franc
12th place Eurodollar
13th place Silver
14th place Canadian Dollar
15th place NASDAQ
16th place Orange Juice
17th place US Dollar
18th place Lumber
19th place Copper
20th place Coffee
21st place Japanese Yen
22nd place Pork Bellies
23rd place Soybean Oil
24th place Cotton
25th place British Pound
26th place Soybean Meal
27th place Natural Gas
28th place Feeder Cattle
29th place Lean Hogs
30th place Oats

In many ways the list is surprising. Mrs. B she is quite satisfied with it. She has a starting balance of $5000 in her account and for her to trade more than one market at a time she will have to restrict herself to markets where the margin is reasonable. She may trade a contract or two of corn, soybeans, wheat, sugar and gold. She might have been able to trade cocoa a month or so ago, it will be more difficult for her today. She probably has to pick and chose from the other markets, selecting those that offer her an opportunity to enter with a controlled risk. She might even exit quickly; perhaps on the same day she enters, if the market does not close in her favor. Mrs. B is anxious to face up to the task ahead of her. Mrs. B and her robots are afraid of no one and no markets. It is Mrs. B versus the unbeaten 30 with the outcome to be decided on December 31st, 2001.

Will Mrs. B look foolish in taking on these 30 powerful markets? The answer is, of course, 'yes'. But remember that in her effort to succeed and to become self-reliant, Mrs. B is well-willing to "look the fool" at any time to anyone. Mrs. B has a theory about this. Her theory is that it is impossible for anyone who makes a profit trading in commodities or options to "look a fool" to anyone. If a trader can make a profit standing on his head and looking at the charts upside down and this trader is able to make a profit doing so year in and year out, it wouldn't take long before every time someone entered a brokerage office they would see one or two investors doing just that. If you can make money in this game, you are not "a fool" - no matter how foolish the method you are using to make that profit may look. Be prepared then, from day number one, to see Mrs. B looking a fool to many of you. But wait until you see the results at the end of December 2001. By then you may be using many of the same "foolish methods" used by Mrs.B during these next 11 months.

As Mrs. B examines these 30 markets she wishes to emphasize that she always uses robots in her trading plan. Not just any ordinary robots. All Mrs. B's robots have names. They are part of her family. They have names and they have duties. In the future, in some families, robots may take out the trash, in other families robots may mow the lawn, in those families that live on farms, maybe the resident robots will feed the cattle and pick the apples. In Mrs. B's family her robots trade commodity futures. They not only trade commodity futures but they have very specific assignments with regard to the futures contracts and how they trade them.

Mrs. B has given her robots these assignments and not once has any robot ever deviated from an assigned task. A parent should be so lucky. Mrs. B has a 100% compliance rate from her robots. Mrs. B has developed a system and method designed to produce a profit for Mrs. B. This is her bottom line. Every robot in her inventory must eventually earn money for Mrs.B. Her robots have never once voiced a word of complaint. Here then are the names of 20 of Mrs. B's robots and the tasks assigned to those 20.

Robot's
Name

Robot's
Task

Emily

Trades nothing but corn and she is always long.

Jacob

Trades nothing but corn and he is always short.

Michael

Trades nothing but soybeans and he is always long.

Sarah

Trades nothing but soybeans and she is always short.

Brianna

Trades nothing but wheat and she is always long.

Matthew

Trades nothing but wheat and he is always short.

Nicholas

Trades nothing but sugar and he is always long.

Samantha

Trades nothing but sugar and she is always short.

Hailey

Trades nothing but gold and she is always long.

Christopher

Trades nothing but gold and he is always short.

Joshua

Trades nothing but cocoa and he is always long.

Ashley

Trades nothing but cocoa and she is always short.

Kaitlyn

Trades nothing but the S&P Index and she is always long.

Austin

Trades nothing but the S&P Index and he is always short.

Tyler

Trades nothing but Treasury Bonds and he is always long.

Madison

Trades nothing but Treasury Bonds and she is always short.

Hannah

Trades nothing but Live Cattle and she is always long.

Brandon

Trades nothing but Live Cattle and he is always short.

Joseph

Trades nothing but Crude Oil and he is always long.

Alexis

Trades nothing but Crude Oil and she is always short.

 

Mrs. B has other robots, two for each market in fact, but we need not name them now. It is sufficient to know that each robot has one assignment and one assignment only and that this assignment is to trade a commodity futures market either long or short. Joseph trades nothing but crude oil and he is always long. Sarah trades nothing but soybeans and she is always short. Emily trades corn long and Jacob trades corn short. Thus it has always been in the robot family of Mrs.B and thus it will always be. Each robot has a single assignment and no robot has ever deviated from that assignment as much as by trading a single mini-contract in another market.

Mrs. B and her robots are willing to "look the fools" under her theory that it is impossible to "look a fool" when you are able to make money in the commodity and options markets of the world.

 

To send Mrs. B any thoughts, click here.

After sending Mrs. B your thoughts, suggestions, or observations, you may then proceed by clicking here.

Bruce Gould

 

Always remember that stock, options, and futures trading may involve substantial risks and that past performance is no guarantee of future performance.